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OUR BLOG

10/02/2016 09:00:00

Storm, storm, storm!

Gertrude, Henry and now Imogen, what have we done to deserve this terrible weather? We’ve all seen pictures on the news of massive waves lashing the shores and people being blown about in the wind. Road and rail transport has been badly affected, as have airline and ferry services. Driving down one of my local roads yesterday, I met a cyclist who was struggling to ride up a gentle hill into the wind, and he was practically standing still. He was wearing shorts – presumably legs dry more quickly than trousers, but I can’t help thinking it wasn’t the best day to be out on a bike if it could possibly be avoided.


One of the more unusual victims of the storm was a series of bridges which had been put in place to allow dormice to cross a newly constructed bypass near Pontypridd, Rhondda Cynon Taf. The roughly 5 mile long bypass runs through a sensitive area, and permission to build it was only granted if the construction company could guarantee safe passage for the tree-living dormice, which are a threatened species. The traditional underpasses often put in place for hedgehogs and other ground-living creatures would not have done the job, so the mesh bridges were installed. Sadly, Imogen caused these to collapse on top of a passing car, which blocked the road for quite a while.

There were also reports of a train which set off on a journey on the Cambrian line near Barmouth on the North Wales coast, a particularly exposed line. Waves were said to have been so high that they battered both sides of the coaches, and the train had to be pulled to a halt. Water started to enter the coaches, which were full of children on their way to school, and not surprisingly, they were said to be terrified by the event. The train eventually headed into Barmouth where adult passengers were allowed to alight, but the children were forced to wait for parents to collect them. It does make you wonder if the train should have set off in the first place.

Apparently the next storm will be called Jake, so that’s one to look forward to.



For London and the South:
0207 903 5144
For Manchester and the North:
0161 839 5117